Sexuality

Research conducted on the topic of sexuality is revealing that most people are able to get sexually aroused by both men and women, even if they are not consciously aware of it.

Recent research conducted by Ritch C. Savin-Williams, who is the Director of Developmental Psychology and the Director of the Sex and Gender Lab in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University, monitored the response of women and their bodies to a range of pornographic material, both heterosexual and homosexual.

During the study, researchers monitored each subject’s body, including eye dilation, which will show a response, regardless of how a person identifies sexually.

“You can’t control your eye dilation,” Savin-Williams explained.

“Essentially, that’s what the whole project attempts to get at, another way of assessing sexuality without relying on self-report.”

The research found that the woman exhibited a positive physiological arousal response to some degree or the other, no matter if the erotic visual stimulation was lesbian or straight. He has also found a similar response with men.

“We show straight men a picture of a woman masturbating and they respond just like a straight guy, but then you also show them a guy masturbating and their eyes dilate a little bit. So we’re actually able to show physiologically that all guys are not either gay, straight, or bi,” Savin-Williams said.

“There are aspects of male sexuality along a continuum, just as we have always recognised with women.”

“Men have gotten so much cultural crap put on them that even if a man does have some sexual attraction to guys, they would never say it.”

While these ideas are not new, with research in the 1940s suggesting that most people fall somewhere on a spectrum that ranges from exclusive heterosexuality to exclusive homosexuality and includes various forms of bisexuality, the research does appear to show that people are increasingly acknowledging their sexual fluidity, especially among the younger generations.